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to realize that this is our katrina. >> the obama administration responded to complaints that fema was late on the scene and anountsed that the deputy administrator will be there tomorrow and fema wants everyone who needs assistance to call. when there's complaints, it's because they haven't been able to reach out. 1- 800-621-fema or disasterassistance.gov. >>> president obama was back on the trail. >> in new jersey yesterday and saw the devastation and you really get a sense of how difficult this is going to be for a lot of people. but you know, we've been inspired these past few days. because when disaster strikes, we see america at its best. the consumer in these times all seem to melt away. there are no democrats or republicans during the storm. just fellow americans. >> his response to the storm has earned him big praise. 78% approve of how he's dealt with the hurricane. images and headlines like this have helped, too, featuring chris christie of new jersey on a bipartisan storm damage tour together from wednesday. but not everyone's a fan of the federal agencies that handle disasters
. >> eric: may i bring -- >> bob -- holdon. >> kimberly: by the way, what happened to bush and katrina? did they do the same thing? it's okay there, but not here. being politically expedient again? >> bob: there are 77 people dead. romney and his people talk about how obama was not prepared. >> greg: you talk about climate change. >> eric: let me do this. i'll bring this back to why i put the two things in the same segment, bob. here is why. we gave him $1 trillion. the administration $1 trillion to beef up the infrastructure. they spent $1 trillion making the grid. burying the grid underground so that every time it's 50-mile-per-hour wind we don't have half the country losing power. that would have been a good use of stimulus money. better use. >> bob: bury new jersey under the ground in four years? >> eric: let me put it this way. $1 trillion closer to getting it done. what did we get with the money we spent? >> kimberly: nothing. >> bob: republicans have to think of something besides sandy to make a case in the final four days. >> greg: that is the point. >> dana: romney did not. what he
. it is not katrina but we are a close second. >>shepard: any time your house is without power or full of water or on the ground you have your own private katrina. a lot of the people staying at your hotel which is not normal, they are from there. >>guest: yes, we own two hotel s in the same parking lot here so we have been here for ten years and we have opened up at the world trade center so we are used to disaster. no one realized how bad this is and on wednesday when we thought the people who are here if a couple of days would leave, we thought it would get better and it was not getting better, we called the marathon people and said we would not send our neighbors into the street and we are going to need to tell the marathon people they is to go someplace else. >>shepard: you are not the only one calling the marathon people. this is a cover of the "new york post" owned by the parent company saying abuse of power, with generators that will power tenths for the marathon folks. listen to what happened on fox business network, where we share resources. here is what happened: charlie gasparino sa
they have a lot in common with the people of the gulf coast who suffered through katrina in 2005. the sheer size and scope of the destruction from hurricane sandy stretches for hundreds of miles, from the jersey shore, to long island. this was a big storm, and has brought a significant part of the country to its knees. >> look at this line! it goes back -- this line goes six miles. look at this! >> reporter: with power still out to millions of people, one of the biggest daily concerns has become gasoline. some lines at stations that still have gas stretched for blocks. tempers of the drivers in those lines frayed. and police have even been called in to patrol the lines to keep the peace. >> i need to run my taxi too. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic ci
called out. >> greg: who can forget the huffington post reporting cannibalism in hurricane katrina. the amount of exaggeration going on toemonize president bush is beyond the pa even happe because media is more interested to stress bipartisan than that. to me would never have happened if mccain was president. >> andrea: there was a difference -- look at the response to hurricane katrina. president bush demonized, wasn't doing enough. >> bob: because fema was a joke of an agency then. horse trader was running it. now everybody who has dealt with fema in this storm gave them praise. >> eric: i love you like a brother but the people who are, you know, there is a makeshift morgue in a school in staten island. there are people who are without power. you saw the people without food, power. fema is not doing their job. there are people struggling and suffering. >> bob: how many people do you think fema has? >> eric: i don't know. bring people in. >> bob: bring some people in. you think they couldn't bring neem, they wouldn't bring neem? they'd let staten island sink? >> eric: apparently t
that katrina could never happen here. but it has happened. and as they pump the tunnels and open the subways, iconic landmarks are twisted and broken, and still we find bodies, and revise upward the count of the dead. and now frustration and fear of the future haunt many, as homeowners scramble to salvage whatever is left and ask when the pain and suffering will stop. and to the long gaslines and impassable roads, broken infrastructure, and lost hours of work and schools add this weather alert. to those living without power in those houses comes word that the temperatures are cooling. down to the low 30s for tonight, and for the next several nights. and much worse than the cold. another nor easter, another wet and windy storm this way comes. >> and bad weather, ladies and gentlemen, the last thing the battered burrough of stat ten eileen need. let's fine out what else mother now has in store. meteorologist justin poric, what's going on? >> well, geraldo, this is the last thing that residents of in the northeast want to think about, a potential storm. this will not be sandy. will not be a big
franklin. after katrina, you were a native of new orleans, you were appointed the vice chairman of the louisiana recovery authority and the job was to handle funds that were being disbursed by the federal government. in watching the rebuilding of new orleans and this whole process, what do you think that you learned that applies to what's going on now in new york and new jersey? >> three things. first of all, leadership matters. if you look at what's happening in new york and new jersey now organization view great leaders, michael bloomberg, deputy mayor bob steele, governor cuomo, governor chris christie. the president, obama, has been very involved. when we went through katrina, we were all back down in new orleans, it wasn't that strong of leadership. ray nagin was the mayor, sometimes not to be found. so i saw the importance of people who take charge and say i'm going to run into this crisis and i'm going to help solve it. secondly, it reminded us that we're all in the same boat together. this election is somewhat about the age-old tension between, all right, we're all indiv
through hurricane katrina know a thing or two about getting back on your feet. so, hundreds of them packed up and drove east to staten island, new york, to help those recovering from superstorm sandy. they say they're just returning the kindness that so many new yorkers showed them in their time of need. dan bowens of wnyw has more. >> new york, staten island, sandy ruined hundreds of homes and we found volunteers working hard to pick up the pieces. >> and the water height is where this is. >> flood waters reached above the windows inside randy's house and several people he didn't know helped him clear out the debris. >> touching, heart warming is not near enough a ward to describe how you feel when these things are going on. and people tyke time out of their life. >> and the neighbor was feeling overwelcomed, debris everywhere in the back yard and then this group just showed up and started cleaning. >> without the 25 hands with me, i wouldn't be able to do anything. >> among the hundreds of workers and volunteers, who come to staten island today and there are hundreds assisting with the c
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
to try this. lis? >>lis: i think so. it happened with katrina in 2005. victims sued fema and actually won. you can sue for gross negligence. it is a contract. here is what i argue to this gentleman on the screen and other people there. as a woman who had literary her roof blown off i am not unbiased on this. you have a contract with fema. we all do, to take kay of discuss protect us if a hall disaster like this. if they do not come through, which they have not in a month for many people as we have seen you can sue for breach of contract, gross negligence. >> two words: sovereign immunity you cannot sue a federal government or the agencies unless they give up a waiver. there is an exception of the gross negligence and willful conduct but that is not what he was saying, they have 475,000 people to need. for us be able to manage the catastrophe, the storm of a century, it is impossible for us to get there and give them the help they need under the immediate circumstances. >>lis: we are talking a month. >>guest: right now we have to do a look and see. >>lis: look and see? look and see? >>gue
of cars flooded and destroyed by super storm sandy, it could exceed that of katrina. watch out, coming up a man who sold more than his fair share of cars. cofounder and former ceo of car max on what mr. obama's reelection means for our economy. and a selloff on wall street, a wild ride for commodities, just look at the gold chart. up next off chicago on whether we might see a continuation tomorrow. we are coming right back. liz: several commodities tanks today following the election result. david: phil flynn at the price futures group joins us now. i don't want to barrel th. the lead, but why didn't gold take off? one of the main factors will be continuation of fed values that raise the dollar value of gold. why didn't it pop more than it did? >> i think because of the concerns over europe. when we are concerned about europe it is always bearish for gold. why is that? if the euro zone falls apart, wanting to have a value is gold. that we have even seen is a possibility of a way out of this mess. even talking "wall street journal" the possibility of goldbach eurobonds as a solution to try
,000 tons which is the weight of the u.s. space station out in outer space. i covered katrina and the debris buildup in katrina, we interview the new york city fire chief and former fire chief that oversaw 9/11 and also the chief of sanitation, this clean-up is bigger than 9/11 and bigger than katrina. what we're seeing throughout the day, 1800 trucks, sanitation trucks working around the clock, full tilt since sandy struck and removing garbage and debris to bring it out of state into pennsylvania and basically you will see publicly traded companies bidding on it, private companies, garbage companies bidding on it because as you know one man's trash is another man's treasure. we will be doing live updates throughout the day. liz: the concept of rebuilding is a twist on the broken windows theory. i am making a stretch, but hopefully there is some type of silver lining from all of this. from sandy to sliding for the fiscal cliff, my next guest says it is time to take risk off the table and protect your portfolio. david joy, risk away, the chief market strategist with sixth thirty-one billion d
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
't know what he shot about. he hot his mouth about katrina and we have seen record low levels. andrew cuomo linked climate change to sandy yesterday. >> steve: a county plans to move forward with a gun tax. under the plan will be a $25 tax on the fire arms and a plan to tax bullets. but the board dropped that because it would be more than the costs of ammunition. >> giant tiger shark. maria, a black belt was swimming in maui. and the shark confronted her and she gave it a best punch in the nose. she got more than a hundred stitchos her hand and thigh. >> steve: that's what you are supposed to do. >> gretchen: a woman was told her bible shirt was offensive. they made her cover tup with a jacket. they say it violates election laws and the attorney said he wants an apology or there will be a lawsuit. >> steve: is the on the ballot there? >> that shirt is permissible. keep the shirt on. >> steve: 20 minutes before the top of the hour. navy seals outraged over what happened in benghazi posted this on facebook. but facebook took it down. doesn't that vialate people's use of free speech. the
, some are now drawing comparisons between this superstorm and katrina. so just how do they measure up? cnn meteorologist severe weather expert chad myers is taking a closer look. he's joining us now. how do they measure up, chad? >> well, first of all, the storm surge with katrina was enormous. almost three times more of a wave or of a surge with katrina as bay st. louis was about 28 feet. manhattan island, downtown, the battery, had about 9.5 feet. haven't seen too many numbers higher than that. 9.5 feet moving into the city comparing to moving into the bay, obviously there's a town there and all the way do biloxi, it's the population density in new york city that is going to -- and in new jersey and connecticut, that is going to put this way up in the record books. katrina, $145 billion in damage. andrew, this is cost for adjusted inflation $43.5 billion. and looks like somewhere sandy will fall somewhere between katrina and into andrew. so probably number two on the scale for dollar damage. now, when it comes to deaths, it's disturbing, wolf, to see and hear how quickly the fatalit
it was obama's katrina, which it is. the jobs report is up. we will check in with karl rove and look at predictions from others as the outcome of tuesday is now pretty much at hand. joining me with reaction to all of this, radio talk show host willie billy cunningham. his radio show is heard nationally across the country on sunday nights. sir, welcome back. ju you are a great american. >> sean hannity, how are you? >> sean: after the photo op,. billy cunningham where does president obama fly? to vegas. meanwhile, it it is beginning to freeze in the northeast. people don't have heat, electricity. the gas stations that are open people are waiting six hours or long are to be able to get gas. he comes to town. he hugs chris christie, photo op and then heads off to vegas. your reaction? >> i would say a few things. number one, i think this is obama's katrina in which he is showing a complete lack of compassion. i can recall a speech he gave in denver in front of 70,000 fans in which he said if you elect me the winds will stop blowing and the oceans will not rise. what happened to the anoi
that has gone back and forth from louisiana, katrina, and new york for 9/11 and back. now back again the brotherhood of firefighters that is straight ahead. >> those are two cities that share tragedy, have tragedy in common. katrina down there. 9/11 up here. now another one with sandy. so that bond -- that fire truck certainly represents that. >>> also, we'll lighten the mood a little bit in "the skinny," she says, maybe not too much. she is going to be fine. talking about brooke burke from abc's "dancing with the stars," when the word "cancer" is involved, we'll have to send her our very best thoughts and warm wishes. details of her condition. she is going to be okay the important thing. stay tuned for details coming up on that in "the skinny". >> what her doctors are telling her. our prayers and thoughts go out to her and her family. first, victims and relatives of those who died were in the courtroom as a judge reaffirmed that jared loughner would never again be a free man. >> as part of a plea deal, loughner was sentenced to seven consecutive life terms plus 140 years. abc's matt
all of this living through this for a second time is proof of how katrina changed the nation's psychology when it comes to storms. >> yes. >> how many lessons have been learned, dark days along the gulf coast in '05. see it playing out. closest thing to katrina since '05. you are seeing the country changed after the storm, even response on every level has changed as well. interesting to watch, yet again for sure. >> yeah. >> coming up next, images are almost too much for adults to comprehend. for children, the pictures from sandy could be downright heartbreaking and confusing. >> we'll show you what one familiar fuzzy face is doing to help them understand. ♪ we have all been assaulted by the sights and sound of hurricane sandy. they can be hard for an adult but overwhelming for a child. >> imagine what it is like for kids. gma anchor josh elliott has this story. >> reporter: we adults called it a super storm. amidst the ferocity of nature's wrath, it was just plain scary. how do you talk to kids about getting through the storm of the century. we got together with a panel of
of katrina because he knew how to get the job done. what do you think of that? when parties get their butts kicked like democrats did in '72, republicans did in '64, when they thought they had -- well, those races didn't look good to begin with, but right now what do you do when you're in a party leadership position? >> if they don't adhere to what bobby jindal is talking about, the senator from new hampshire. if they don't understand haley barbour, i can assure you democrats are really going to get that message and, believe me, if democrats organized the red state like they did in ohio this time around or like they did in florida this time around or like they did in one or two other states this time around, those red states would send the numbers that nancy pelosi needs to become speaker again. and that's going to happen if the republicans keep thinking like mitt romney. >> you know, that's the question, ashley, and that is as you see the demographic changes, younger voters tend to be more liberal. a lot of hispanic people moving into the country having a lot of kids and voting and being c
.n. ambassador susan rice. the nation's katrina van hubbell will weigh in. >>> and later it's been two weeks since the election and alan west refuses to let democracy run its course. we'll bring the latest from florida. stay with us. [ male announcer ] the only thing better than giving her a diamond is surprising her with one. save the surprise. shop online and ship to any zales store free. only at the diamond store. ♪ i'm lost in the light i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent resear
and local platforms, whether it was katrina or other events we've actually been able to bring in national guard platforms to provide 911 systems for cities that have lost those systems. we recently in the joplin tornados and also tuscaloosa tornados we brought in dod equipment to replace what was destroyed. from the fire side i know there's a lot of things you are doing to work around the interoperatability issues with regard to communications between fire and dod and maybe if ray or anybody else wants to speak to that. >> our communications challenges still exist. we have excellent telecom communications, we have a layered effect of our radio systems. we have mobile command posts that we can exercise. so we're prepared for power outages, reduction of telecoms, we have a layered effect for our communications. but as everybody here said, we need help. if somebody here can help me get a navy or marine corps aircraft to talk to my guys on the ground tactically, i need that and i don't have that today. i use a command control helicopter, a civilian helicopter, to handle that and transfe
hurricane katrina. >> we're looking for high risk cargo that comes into the country. >> reporter: ricardo shelter is port director of baltimore for customs and border patrol. this year the agency intercepted five insects never seen before in baltimore. some can be smaller than a grain of rice. >> you could have crops that are destroyed in the u.s. states. you could have interception of a pest or plant product that can make people sick. >> reporter: just look at what the brown march more mav -- marmalateed stink bug has done. the stink bug hit this farmer's orchard hard this year. >> the stink bug have already sucked some of the juice out of cells. >> reporter: he'll have to sell these apples for juice and get half the price he would for a good apple sold in stores. the problem with invasive pests like this is there are no natural predators here. so farmers have to spray to keep the crop damage down. that increases their cost, a cost which is passed on to you in the food you buy. >> how much does it cost me in money? gee, that's a million dollar question. >> reporter: the u.s. departme
... to first by the storm. volunteers say their city got help after katrina... and now they''e payinn it forwaadd "the main reason e're here is bbcauue we knew how peoole came to new orleens nd a lot of that was new york firefighters. it was a big impact with that. they came and elpee their fellow firrfighterr, helped feed us and do things so as soon as we had the opportuniiy to come up, we jumped on the truckk cameeup and starred cooking jam" jambalaya."sandy is ressonsible for at least nnw yook city alone... 43 in - 33&across the country... people are paying tributt to u-s serviceemembers.on sunday... president obama spoke during aa ceremony at arlington national cemetery.... n honor of veterans day. bagpipes playing playingmilitary veteeans... livinggand dead... were honorrd and remembered for serving their country. president obama laid a wreath in a solemn ceremony.knowns... &p45-110 "today a ppoud nation express ur ratitude. but we do so mindful that no ceremony or paraae no hug or hand shakee is enough to trulyyhonor that service forr of that we must do mmre. for and every
in katrina, ll the infection thhngs were related &pto coli." another problem many face... is having a good supply of the death toll from the fungal . meningitis outbbeak ris to twentyynine.aavirginia patienn has dded from the fungal meningitts tied to the tainted steroid outbreak.that raises plby ng &pcoounding center of framingham massachusetts. no powerr nooheat and now no shortage sweeping new jersey power- as residents line up in &pbbfore the immted gas supply is gone.aa verwhelled mass traasittsysttm and masse wer tageue tigmaanthteeres set to op ornight hommowneessarr hoping their nightmare will soon be over. 26-33"llst night i was ii a and i was aboot 50 feet from it and they rannout. you are not even guaranteee iffyou wait in line for an hour." 1:066112"they arr sayiigg sevvn days so that gives us &pfive more days without electricity, but we hoping new york governor andrew cuomo haa declared a transportattonn &psttte of emergency to last until friday. reception in.. new kkwsetsbisi sutore providers a-t-aad-t and networkssin the days following people crowding arouud a power
paid a price katrina, and this president built it back up again, but not political people in, bupeople who knew what to is papaying off this week. >> colby? >> it also draws a sharp contrast between the candidates. utech president obama pushihing effort and the the vehicle to coordinate the effort, and you saying hey last year rid of femema enter the back to theties which shows no appreciation for the role that plays during that time of agedy. >> it is a nightmare for romney. >> it is,, especially if you are after women voters in ohio, the so-called waitress vote. th is an ad for a president who worries aut you. terrible for romney, and it stopped his momentum. polls are wrong and win anyway, but just ,ooking at the polls right now a.ma has got >> did romney have momentum, or was that just republicans been? >> he had the momentum after the first t debate and he decimated the lead -- >> but we have had three since --n >> but obama was never able to recapture the lead. >> i cannot say with certainty that there was momentum,o momentum. onok at the polls evy hour a sense, and you get .hat
now as it was at the time of katrina. i do not understand why there's not enough water in new york. st. st. i turned 65 last week. i'm getting married. planning a life. there are risks, sure. but, there's no reward without it. i want to be prepared for the long haul. i see a world bursting with opportunities. india, china, brazil, ishares, small-caps, large-caps, ishares. industrials. low cost. every dollar counts. ishares. income. dividends. bonds. i like bonds. ishares. commodities. diversication. choices. my own ideas. isres. i want to use the same stuff the big guys use. ishares. 9 out of 10 large, professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. introducing the ishares core, etfs for the heart of your portfolio. taefficient and low cost building blocks to help you keep more of what you earn. call your advisor. visit ishares.com. ishares. yeah, ishares. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo.
oceanic and not mr. association, the costliest storms to hit katrina by one at funk shot. take, about 30 billion. andrew in 90 to about 36.5 billion. wilma in 2005, i've been 18 billion, charlie indo for 15 billion, reader, frances and jeanne all and hurricane damage. in your view, does the national flood insurance program currently structured work? >> i think it does work. it does help protect consumers from an uninsurable event in the private arcade. the program was created in 1968 was the result created because the private market could not accurately and in suitably underrate the insurance risk. so what was happening was people were completely without flood insurance protection. so is happening in the 60s and 50s as american citizens were being flooded and the only recourse that she had was federal disaster assistance after the fact. so the program was created to have people pay into a program and be prepared for storm and a flood event before it happened. now, it certainly could use improvement. you know, there are critics out there whose fate is is too subsidized by the federal gove
. some people calling it their katrina in a very unhappy way, of course, in part because it's cold. it's a cold katrina. and people are without heat and electricity. seats very tough. how does it play politically? we'll know in retrospect, i think like everything else, in this race. it is not known at this point how it will play. you can argue that the president looked commanding and like a leader when he came up to new jersey. you could also argue that things are starting to look a little tough in some of the neighborhood neighborhoods in new york and jersey, and so that might work against him. it's hard to say, but one thing i think is probably clearly true and that is the fact of the storm took the subject matter of mitt romney's closing statements, the end of his campaign, his big arguments sort of snuffed that out a little bit for a few days. inevitably, as we all talked about the storm. we weren't talking about the economy. we weren't doing all of that stuff. so in some way, that may have hurt him. and yet, at the same time, that all that was happening, in westchester, ohio, he w
and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so
, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the things as a command and control tool that
is that there are pockets that are very similar to some of the hardest-hit areas after katrina. >> reporter: the company plans to help rebuild seaside heights, still closed off to residents. back in staten island, patrice says she doesn't know what's next, but she does know what she needs. >> i need some place to stay permanently. that i can afford to pay once fema help ends. >> reporter: and this is a community-based center run by volunteers. also fema has set up 55 centers throughout the hardest-hit areas of staten island. >> michelle frandsen, thank you. >>> meanwhile, the red cross says it's received $117 million in donations to help victims of sandy. and tells us that so far its response has been near flawless. but that's not what we heard in some hard-hit areas of new york city where storm victims claim the country's preeminent disaster relief organization has been missing in action. here's nbc's senior investigative correspondent lisa myers. >> reporter: two weeks after sandy hit, residents of breezy point, new york, still wonder if more help will ever arrive. >> we haven't seen red cross at all.
were in hurricane katrina. they travel all laid to s.i. and volunteers as were asked by the media out why. they said they came to help us in the wake of katrina and now it's our turn to repay the favor. they fed the people as well as the first responders affected by the storm jambalaya and such. >> a lot of the people i can help us were new york firefighters. they help desk and they did things so we get the an opportunity to come out we got up here and start to cut the jambalaya. >> this storm is disposal for at least a hundred and 13 deaths. >> so many questions about what causes autism in children and doctors are finding in the possible link. a new study coming out this morning finds that women who had the flu while they were pregnant or twice as likely to have the child later diagnosed with optimism. those who had a fever that lasted a week or longer while there were present were three times as likely to have a child diagnosed with off to as a it affects one in every 88 children. >> we have more free ahead in this morning where monetary temperatures were in his chilly everywhere. t
thing about katrina it happens in new orleans during the summer, is it wasn't cold. but the devastation along the coast line is similar. just without the flooding. the water just stayed there. in katrina the traditional hugertraditionalhurricane damage was not the problem. it was that the floodwaters stayed. >> eliot: the lack of fundamental energies, heat food the devastation the public is getting equally upset in terms of the frustration levels. >> i don't think the people people--rockaway is the peninsula which is have very interesting point because it starts at breezy point, and then it goes down to the far rock rockaway. so you've got this racial ethnic kind of kaleidoscope there. but then you have everybody in the same boat because anybody has any power or water. no hot water. and it's just--it mounts up. it's like a geometric progression. if you don't have heat and hot water for four days. that's in the so bad. but every day that you go through it, and now it's almost been three weeks it becomes more and more horrific. >> eliot: erroll, the anxiety level is growing and it grows d
up. the second things, used cars, same thing in katrina you have a whole bunch of cars taken off the market because they're not usable and all of a sudden used car prices go up, 10, 20, saw them up 20% reported last week and all the way across, diesel oil. we're going to see it across the state it's not just a northeast issue. >> brenda: gary k, what do you think of that? >> toby is absolutely right. whenever you have shortages with an event like this, especially in highly populated area, lumber, building materials, we can run the gamut here. prices go higher and costs go higher to business and consumers and that will definitively effect an economy. especially still trying to get up. a very tough thing to watch. >> brenda: gary b. is it having an impact or limited and temporary? >> the latter brenda, yes. look, it's the less, less temporary and less limited, i think the closer you were to the northeast. so, people obviously on long island, new jersey are going and people in most in spikes california feel it less. toby makes a very good point about insurance rates, but i think bac
occurs in the gulf port area during katrina. they expected us to learn from that and indeed we have. i caution you again, we are not prepared, we are not prepared for the next nightmare scenario, but we can better prepare ourselves every day with the activities you are taking on now. i thank you in advance for the family, the child, the son, the daughter, who has no idea that their life is going to be uprooted by catastrophe within the confines of the san francisco bay area or perhaps in a western pacific nation or in africa or south america. i thank you in advance for the good work you are going to do. because there's going to come a point, be it an ert quake, be it a tsunami, be it a man-made heinous terrorist catastrophe, that makes a large group of people feel helpless and feel hopeless. your efforts today, your passion, your commitment, your desire to make a difference, will give help and give hope to those people. it may be your family or it may be a family across the world. it is what we do, it is what you do and i'm proud to count myself among you. so i thank you i
the cuban missile crisis, 9/11, katrina, those were events that felt like the world were coming. there are people that are worried about other kinds of doomsdays and they plan on surviving. >> it looks like in has been another series of attacks, cyber attacks on united states banks. >> bill: recent cyber attacks could have doomsday style consequences. that has our government concerned. >> attackers could also seek to disable or degrade critical military systems and communication networks. collective result of these kinds of attacks could be a cyber pearl harbor. >> we have an insane regime in iran run by people who are psychotic who may get the nuclear weaponry to act on their insane thoughts. that means we could have a nuclear holocaust. >> what we depict on our show they have a variety they are concerned about. everything from tsunami to a nuclear blast. >> a koe executive producer of doomsday preppers. >> there are three touch stones. first touch stone is 9/11. second touch stone is destruction of american cities which is katrina. third touch stone is the financial collapse.
at home, new york governor andrew cuomo calls superstorm sandy more impactful than hurricane katrina. now both new york and new jersey are asking for a combined total of more than $71 billion in federal aid. in new york, the money would pay not only for cleanup and recovery, it would also be used to try and limit damage for future storms. new jersey which saw heavy damage to its transit system and shoreline suffered nearly $30 billion in losses. >>> meanwhile, new jersey governor christie has now filed papers seeking re-election. >>> and now for a look at your national weather, let's turn to nbc meteorologist bill karins. he's tracking that weather channel forecast. good morning to you, bill. >> sensitive topic when you start comparing storms to katrina and all these. >> it does. >> it's like any big event. >> absolutely. >> yeah, over 1,000 people died and monetarily there's issued. every storm is different as we learned with sandy and all the other big hurricanes that have hit this country. we're not dealing with anything too bad today. if you have travel plans on the east coast, pay at
katrina. and another key part of partnerships, when i was the federal on scene coordinator during deep water horizon, it's not in the national response framework, but every parish president, every mayor, every governor had a coast guard liaison officer at the oak pride and above level. so, if they didn't like how the response was going, go to my liaison officer. don't go to anderson cooper and then cause the white house to react to what they're seeing on cnn. so, how do you get in front of that news cycle? and the only way you can do that as tip o'neill said, all things in politics are local and i think we heard from vice admiral nathan that i think all responses are local as well. and, so, we really need to start most importantly at the local level, at those planning levels, because the first shot of any campaign, the plan will change, but the partnerships need to remain constant. >> and, general baldwin, we heard from colonel span owe about now your three hats of authority, your state hat, your federal hat, and now your dual status hat. but if you could talk about the partnerships an
.j. winnck has more. >> some are still living without power. >> this is our katrina. i expect the people of this state to be treated with the same level of compassion that the citizens were treated in the aftermath of hurricane katrina. >> it has added discomfort for this long island resident fighting a tough battle against cancer. for 11 days, this has been the only place she can keep warm. >> i'm disgusted. >> her power should be back on by the middle of next week, they say. until then, her husband is doing his best to fight off the chill. >> of long as i can keep her warm, happy. >> . gas to power their generators and drivers the fuel for their cars. 10 days after the killer storm mayor michael bloomberg is finally taking action instituting an odd-even gas rationing system. >> they should have done this from day one. >> gasoline will be available with license plate numbers ending in an odd number or a letter beginning today. plate numbers ending in an even number or zero can get gas starting on saturday. for the most part, it seems to have the intended effect of cutting down on aligns
hurricane sandy has reminded us of other disasters, from hurricane katrina, to joplin, now think of this. the people in all three of those places are reaching out to help those suffering in those regions tonight. tonight, their story from janet shamlian. >> reporter: hundreds of miles from the despair, everything from diapers to batteries, collected from the people of louisiana, meant for people in new jersey. >> we know what they're suffering in new jersey, we just wanted to do something to help. >> reporter: the effort started simply, at first, just messages of support. like these from hurricane katrina survivors, images that quickly went viral, them, more help. >> some of the first people we saw down here were firefighters from new york, the new york police department and folks from new jersey. everybody came down here and helped us, it is time to help everybody back. >> reporter: there is a similar feeling from joplin, missouri, which was devastated by the tornado. even people living in the fema trailers, the community wanted to help. >> it brought back a lot of memories. >> reporter
the federal government to do whatever it takes to get this job done. this is our katrina. i expect the people of this state to be treated with the same level of compassion and generosity that the citizens of louisiana and mississippi and alabama were treated in the aftermath of hurricane katrina. >> to cope with the giant lines at the gas pumps, new york has followed new jersey's lead by issuing a mandatory gas rationing system. >>> coming up on the news edge at 11:00 a new journey for homeless vets, t first step towards a new home and a new beginning coming your way next. >> and gary's got your weekend forecast. got to say, this is sounding promising. >> i sure hope so, definitely real nice for both of these days, saturday and sunday. we'll look at it in detail coming up in the full forecast. >> coming up in sports can georgetown and maryland pull off the upsets of two top 10 teams? and on the nba hardwood tempers flare between the wizards and bucks. we'll explain why later in sports. >> is in fox 5 news edge at 11:00.  hey! y, baby. [ starts car ] were you eating sm
was stronger than katrina in terms of surface energy and stronger than andrew or whohugo. it had more damaging power than any of those storms. clubs break and chilly tonight temperatures mid-20s inland. a high of 48 for election day. then we could be flirting with 70 degrees part of this weekend. and then talk about thunderstorms for the bears game may be. is it possible that because louisiana was a bathtub so speaking just held all of the water from katrina and that's what it looked so much worse than sandy? >> i think there is truth to that. this integrated kinetic energy takes into account the area of which the wind is blowing so it's a better index then looking at the damage potential of all of these storms. >> a bipartisan push to get voters to close a new effort in encouraging immigrants to get out and vote. the name your price tool shows you a range of coverages and you pick the price that works for you. great. whoa, whoa, jamie. watch where you point that thing. [ mocking ] "watch where you point that thing." you point yours, i point mine. okay, l-let's stay calm. [ all shouting ]
to be thrown out. and you will hear the memory of katrina more and more in the coming days. like katrina, three days out, we're still learning about places receiving very little help and attention, like staten island, ann curry has more. >> reporr: brian, good evening to you, that is right, the outrage boiled over here in staten island, because more than three days after the hurricane here, people from the close-knit community, accused them of responding much slower here than to the richer parts of the city. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> reporter: staten island has had enough. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help, immediately. >> reporter: residents here are asking why hasn't more help arrived? >> i think we're not getting more attention, because we are a working class neighborhood. and it is kind of like fend for yourself kind of thing. >> reporter: on the streets hit with debris, where the death toll has gone up to at least 19, today, the fury was seen live on television. >> but you need to come here and help us, we need he
katrina days and now we hear good things about the matter. neil: you can say we are on top of something. but generally, itimplies you're telling the truth. so if you're going to make a speech to say things are good, well, things better be good. because otherwise, you are lying. doesn't that ring true for ths staten island resident who joins usn the phone. marianne, how are things going? >> things are not any better, neil. still the same in staten island. we were abandoned yesterday. with that nor'easter came in, fema closes their doors due to weather conditions. over a week since the storm. neil: what is the relief center supposed to do? >> are you talking about fema? neil: the fema center. >> it gives people in staten island to go there and talk to representatives and people. there is a gn on the door that says that fema is close to the weatherford really? that's what they're telling people? these are people that don't have any homes, electricity or lights and no ple to go. they are put out of their houses. and then they go to a fema center and they are closed due to the weather. it's
and there is a lot of suffering this is our hurricane katrina. we really felt like we were being ignored. the rest of the country was seeing something, but it wasn't us. that dramatically started to chan yesterday and certainly today with secretary napolitano coming, the national ceo of the red cross. >> no doubt. the boots will stop hitting the ground, whether it is the red cross and fema. fema was knocking on doors. [talking over each other] neil: what were they doing when they were knocking on doors? >> giving people desperately needed information and letting them know wat the processes and there were inspectors looking at how to assees the damage to the people can start to get some funding so they can start replacing in putting together their lives. going door-to-door is tremely important. a lot of things that happened today that, you know, need desperately to be done. we are still hurttng. it is a tremendous amount to be done. there are a lot of people are looking for answers and still haven't been gone through. the only backslapping that there should be at all is from the volunteers of the s
in the past, the slow response to hurricane katrina, the formaldehyde ligand trailers purchased for katrina victims to live in. and now it is becoming more and more clear hurricane sandy may well be another example of the government blowing i it's a staten island resident had a same complaints residents of new orleans had seven years ago. where is fema when we need them. other problems that liberal bureaucracy huggers like to ignore. according to a new analysis from the heritage foundation, fema dollars after all taxpayer dollars look more and more like a goody bag, honeypot for presidents to raise. think of them as a political porkbarrel spending agency because that is unfortunately what it has become. the disaster declarations are on the rise. reagan had 28 per year on average. under nine under bill clinton. obama, 153. he takes the cake. heritage foundation rates to put this in perspective in somewhere in america in 2011 disaster occurred every day and a half. so strong it required the intervenon of the federal government because each of these disasters overwhelm the state and the local
says the federal government's response to hurricane sandy is actually worse than that of katrina. how will wall street react to the results of this election? how different will congress actually be? ron christie will join us as well. stay with us, the polls are closing with results now minutes away. we're coming right back. 0t[h7 lou: some good news for coastal residents the northeast still cleaning up after hurricane sandy and under a lack of power and gasoline shortages. forecasters say a nor'easter that has been expected to hit the region tomorrow will be weaker than originally forecast the storm ravaged areas in new york and new jersey still could see high wind gusting 50 miles per hour and storm surges again reaching only 3 feet. mayor michael bloomberg now asking residents of low-lying waterfront areas to evacuate ahead of the storm. meanwhile eight days after the hurricane slammed into the northeast nearly 900 homes and businesses remained without power. rudy giuliani blasted obama and fema over the handling of the hurricane. >> their performance has been abysmal. the presiden
and not a problem and that was the same kind of initial reaction we got after katrina, 2005, i'm not again, not comparing the gravity of the two events, but comparing the immediate initial response over the handling of this event and what i'm noting is the distinct difference in the coverage of 2005 versus this storm in 2012. and whether it's going to be an issue a few days from know you. >> it could be. what we're seeing now that the mayor's moment of let them eat cake, passed, the marathon. i've yet to see him in staten island. >> neil: i don't know that he's been there yet. >> that's interesting. doesn't that tell you everything that your two people you listened and other lady you interviewed said. the fact of the matter is, there is a political effort to run the clock out and with the media just like they've done on libya, just like they've hidden the truth about libya, it's the hide the truth about this and the service of obama's campaign of the let's get it straight. the president-- >> and the first to take camera crews to go to staten island and show it, fox was. and other media glo
surpass the cost of hurricane katrina which stood $110 billion. when you look at the numbers, basically the power outages in the region from hurricane sandy are about two times more power outages versus what we saw in hurricane katrina. when it comes to the number of homes destroyed, 50% more homes destroid in hurricane sandy versus hurricane katrina cat. hurricane katrina claimed for lives. 1866 people were killed by hurricane katrina. versus 185 deaths from hurricane sandy. destruction and damage governor cuomo may have it right. as to who pays for it? ordinarily the u.s. government picks up 75% of the tab for restoring government services including things like mass transit. as for now both governor cuomo and governor christie of new jersey are saying wait a second we want the federal government to pick up even more of the tab possibly 90% to 100%. governor cuomo is pretty pointed whether or not he will let his state's taxpayers pay any of the costs. here is governor cuomo. >> to try to finance through taxes, would incapacitate the state. my philosophy hasn't changed. tax increases ar
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
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